Violets and Amaranth

Eating weeds and gaining grains: an adventure in eating


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Thanksgiving Redux

It was a great Thanksgiving in our corner of the world.  We’ve been gluten-free for a little over 2 years and this is the first Thanksgiving that there was no cross contamination, no after dinner reactions.  Just a lovely visit with family and good food. A sample of our menu:

Pulled pork (who needs turkey?)- tastes great as is, with BBQ sauce, or with enchilada sauce

Baked sweet potato or mashed potato

Cranberries and jello

Soft Bread- I tried the Brown Bread from the Complete Allergy-Free Comfort Foods Book by Elizabeth Gordon.  We made it with hard cider rather than beer, since we have a hops allergy here.  Wow is all I can say.  It was a great, soft bread.  Even if it tasted like apples from the cider.

Cooked Carrots

Pumpkin Pie.  We made a pie crust, only instead of butter, I used 6 tablespoons palm shortening and 2 tablespoons coconut oil.  Then we used this pumpkin custard using flax for the eggs and agave for the sugar.  Yum!

Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free Chex Mix- how hard could it be?  It was really easy:

  • 4 ½ cups Rice Chex
  • 4 ½ cups Corn Chex
  • 1 cup gluten-free snack chips , Snikidinks work well or find a dairy-free snack chip
  • 1 cup gluten-free lentil crackers, pepper flavor is good, broken into bite size pieces
  • 1 cup peanuts, optional
  • 6 tablespoons butter or canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 ½ teaspoons salt
  • ¾ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon onion powder
Preheat oven to 250.
2.Combine Chex, chips, crackers and peanuts in a 13×9 pan and set aside.
3.If using butter, melt and add the Worcestershire sauce and spices to the butter or oil. Stir until well combined.
4.Pour the seasoning mixture over the Chex mixture and toss until everything is coated.
5.Bake for an hour, stirring every 15 minutes.

There you have it.  Christmas baking here I come!

What was your Thanksgiving success story?  If you have a great recipe share it in the comments section.

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Thoughts on the Allergy-Free Deserts Cookbook (and my all purpose flour blend recipe)

Despite my lack of posts, I am in fact managing to make a recipe a week out of Elizabeth Gordon’s cookbook Allergy-Free Deserts.  And if you haven’t done so already, go check out her blog.  I have tried 10 of her recipes so far, and I’d rate 8 out of 10 as top-notch, and the two that weren’t absolutely amazing, were so much better than anything else I’ve tried, and honestly the lack of perfection was probably user error.  Here are my thoughts:

Three cakes (with frosting):

I have made the Coconut Cake, Chocolate Zucchini Cupcakes, and let’s throw the Berry Muffins in here too, even though they aren’t technically cake.  All three are 5 out of 5 stars.  Just perfect.  They all had great taste and felt like cake.  None of them lasted long in this house and I served both the cake and cupcakes to family and friends who also agreed they were great!  I did try a version of the Vegan Buttercream Frosting on the coconut cake, and that was a 4 out of 5 for me, but I am sure that was my fault.  I didn’t follow the recipe exactly, so I can’t be surprised it wasn’t the same level of perfection that the rest of the delights in this book seem to be.

A slice of coconut cake.

Chocolate Zucchini Cupcakes (and a rhododendron branch)

Five other great baked goods:

The very first recipe I tried were the Cherry Crumb Bars.  Mine didn’t work out quite right, this is another 4 out of 5, but it was good and the crumb toping tasted like crumb topping should.  I think the problems I had were again user error.  Why can’t I follow a recipe properly?  Oh, and if you make it- use two cans of pie filling- one just doesn’t seem to be enough 🙂 .

In the perfect category are the Cinnamon Swirl Rolls, the Pumpkin Bread (which we have also made and gifted to a friend already), Free-form Raspberry Scones, and the Pancakes.  Ah the Pancakes.  Seriously, I have never had such a great gluten-free pancake.  In fact, you won’t even notice they are gluten-free.  They are easy to make, and come out perfect every time.  We’ve tried for over a year to make such satisfying pancakes.  This recipe alone is worth the price of the book (with that coconut cake and the muffins also worth the price of admission).

Which brings me to pie:

I haven’t actually made any of the pies in the book yet, but I have made the pie crust for a beef pot pie and a fig pie.  It is good.  It’s the best gluten-free crust I’ve found yet.  It still isn’t as perfect as I want a pie crust to be, but honestly, if I never find anything better than this, I’ll be happy.

Why the lack of photos?  Most things we ate so fast, we didn’t even stop to get the camera.  She has great photos in the book though.

Final Thoughts:

In my mind, two reasons these recipes are so great are 1) she’s trained in baking, so she knows what she’s doing but more importantly 2) she found a great flour blend that actually works.  If you are like us, first you start with a commercial blend, but it tastes off.  Then you start trying to make a blend yourself, but things don’t rise, the item is only good 10 minutes after you bake it, or it still tastes off.  I always thought this had something to do with us not using eggs.  Now I know it gluten-free and egg-free can be very satisfying.

Her blend is a combo of garbanzo bean, tapioca and potato starch flours (and she sells it pre-made).  I was already experimenting with something similar, and actually haven’t used her exact blend in any of these recipes.  Instead I have riffed off her proportions to come up with a millet-based blend.  We have some family with issues with beans, so we try not to cook with bean flours, especially if we want to share!  I’m still tweaking the proportions, but basically this is the flour blend I have been using:

  • 1/4 Cup millet flour
  • 1/4 cup sorghum flour
  • 1/4 cup potato starch OR sweet rice flour
  • 1/4 cup tapioca flour

If I need more flour, I up the proportion of millet and sorghum first and then the potato and tapioca.  I’m finding that as long as I use some combination of these flours, most recipes are fairly forgiving if I deviate from the proportions.

A year and a half in, and maybe, just maybe, we’re starting to figure this out 🙂


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Getting Started: Living Life Gluten-Free

I meant to write this post on our anniversary of being gluten-free, which was early last fall. The mad rush to preserve summer’s goodness got in the way of blogging then. Recently a couple of different people of mentioned to me or my husband that they want or need to be gluten-free- but where to start?

Here’s what worked for us. This isn’t the only way to do it. I offer our story as a menu to pick and choose from; maybe something on here will work for those of you considering* going gluten-free. A little over a year later and we have so many fewer ailments to deal with. Years of pain and related health troubles have been erased or reduced. Once you start feeling better, it is worth all the effort of getting started. And now? Gluten-free cooking is fairly easy. I wouldn’t go back- not for anything.

(*I should also say here that you should make all major diet changes with the advice of your health care professional)

First, find some support: For us, this came in several forms.

Books:

We read books that first educated us on Celiac’s Disease. One of my favorites is The Hidden Epidemic, by Peter Greene.

Real life people:

We also talked with friends who were already gluten-free. We knew at least 3 people before we made the switch ourselves. The best bit of advice that we got was, “Try it for 6 months to a year. If you don’t feel better, go back to wheat. What have you got to lose?”

There are lots of other support groups at www.celiac.com and www.celiac.org, along with tons of resources.

Enlist the support of family.

It is really hard to go gluten-free, or anything-free by yourself. When you are the one who is sick, it is hard to have the creative energy to figure this out. Find someone in your circle of family and friends who can help you cook the way you need to for a good 4-6 weeks. That way if you get overwhelmed, someone else is there keeping things on track. That’s how this blog was born. I have no food restrictions at all, but someone needed to help the Geographer get his diet under control. Now that I’ve navigated us to a stable, functional diet, he’s ready to get back in that kitchen!

It also helped to have the whole house follow the Geographer’s restrictions. We get enough cross-contamination when we’re out and about, we don’t need it in the house too. If you don’t have a food restriction, remember you can always get your favorite food when you eat out. Especially when you’re starting a diet with a new restriction, whether that is gluten or something else, having everyone on board helps you figure out how to live normal life with that restriction faster.

Social Media.

Facebook has several gluten-free groups. The one I’m in has people who post recipes and product information all the time. I know some of these people in real life too, which makes the group feel even more supportive. I’ve noticed Twitter also has a #glutenfree hash tag, so if you like to tweet, check them out!

Blogs:

There are tons of blogs. I didn’t find any in particular to follow, so I started my own. I’ve noticed that there are 2 tiers of gluten-free writing. There is a main tier for those with gluten as the only dietary restriction. Most blogs, cookbooks, and support are aimed at this group. If you fall in this group, you have a lot of choices for finding recipes. A lot of those recipes will work because they rely on egg or soy to give your cooking binding.

The second tier is where my household falls. We are finding more and more people with the same allergy list and the gluten intolerance/Celiac’s problem. If you can’t have egg, soy, and all the other things we can’t have, finding resources is harder. That’s why I started this blog. I’m trying to get resources in one place for folks like us. But, everything I post will work even if you only have a gluten problem.

Support is great, but what am I going to EAT?!

 Pre-Packaged:

More and more companies are offering gluten-free products. If you like the pre-made route, and you can have eggs and soy, most major grocery stores offer brands like Udi and Schar, with pre-made bread and pasta products. Amy’s Soups offer a wide range of gluten-free options, and there is always Bob’s Red Mill for various flours, cakes, and cookie mixes. Now that I’ve settled on the flour blend that works best for us, I buy those flours in bulk from the local natural food store. My favorite pasta brand is a quinoa/corn pasta from Ancient Harvest. I like it tons better than rice or plain corn pasta, and it is higher in protein, so there is no starch crash like traditional pasta has. If your grocery doesn’t carry what you’d like to buy, ask them to order it, or look on Amazon or Vitacost. Someone will sell you the food you want!

Homemade:

This is where people get worried, but really, even if you think you don’t like to cook, you can make your food from scratch. I spend about 1-2 hours a day on food prep, and I spend a little less than $10 per day per person on food in my house. It did take time to get it so streamlined, but it was worth the effort. We are gluten-free and it isn’t breaking the bank or taking all day to make the food. But, as you transition to cooking more, realize the beginning will have a learning curve. If you live in northern Ohio and want help, let me know. I love to consult with people and teach you the fine art of…..

Substitution:

If you are gluten-free or allergy-free, this is your cooking skill. You don’t have to toss out your favorite recipes. You have to learn to substitute. You need to figure out the flour blend the works for you. Start subbing there, and make changes as you go. The “Tips and Tricks” category on this blog is often about substitution. When I consult with people, I often just help them navigate how to substitute what they can have in for what they can’t. Our main substitutions are:

  • 1 cup all-purpose wheat flour= ¼ cup millet flour, ¼ cup sorghum, ¼ cup potato starch OR sweet rice flour, ¼ cup tapioca flour. If you can have eggs, you probably won’t need so many types of flour.
  • 1 egg= 1 tablespoon ground flax-seed steeped in 3 tablespoons boiling water
  • soy sauce and hoisin sauce
  • 1 cup rolled oatmeal= 1 cup quinoa flakes (this makes a great granola too!)
  • xanthan gum- most recipes that use flour need ½ to 1 teaspoon to aid in binding.
  • Creamed soups- I use Bette Hagman’s recipe from her Gluten-Free Gourmet book.
  • Gravy- replace wheat flour with brown rice flour in a basic roux
  • Tortillas- use lettuce wraps, or buy Mesa corn at the grocery, a tortilla press, and make them the traditional, wheat-free way
  • 1 tablespoon lemon= 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar or 1 teaspoon tamarind concentrate
  • Palm shortening – I tried to do without this, but cookies and pie crust need a shortening, and this is the only kind out there that is soy-free
  • coconut oil- I couldn’t bake without it!

Books (part 2):

I cannot sing the praises of the Allergy-Free Desert Cookbook by Elizabeth Gordon enough. If you can’t have wheat or egg or soy or dairy, buy it. It is worth the investment. If your gluten-free cakes are disappointing, buy this book. If you are frustrated with pie dough, use this book. Every cake and pie crust I’ve made from this book so far is perfect. She has a blog too. Right now, that’s my favorite cookbook. I used to advocate for Bette Hagman’s books as a good GF starting point, but gluten-free cooking has come a long way since her time. If you need to read the classics, start with any of Hagman’s books, but if you just want to jump into what’s simple, start with Gordon’s book.

Snacks on the go:

This one has taken us the most time to figure out. What to snack on? The vending machine at work no longer works for us! Our short list includes: gluten-free crackers (Mediterranean Snack Food’s Baked Lentil Crackers and Blue Diamond’s Nut-Thins Crackers are our favorites), corn or potato chips, popcorn (We make it ourselves. I don’t know if microwave popcorn has gluten in it or not), nachos, fruit (grapes, dried fruit), quinoa granola, and well, now the list seems endless!

Eating out:

I’ve mentioned elsewhere on this blog about the national Gluten-free restaurant registry. But, we find that while restaurants do offer items that are gluten-free, they also can have cross contamination issues due to how food is handled in restaurants. If you are supper sensitive, give the restaurants a pass until your sensitivity calms down. Most areas now have gluten-free finder sites such as http://glutenfreetoledo.com/ and http://neohioceliac.com/restaurants.html.

Don’t dismiss the smaller, local places that don’t make it on these registries. If you have a favorite local place, call them. Tell them what you need, and they will likely accommodate you. Our most successful meals out have been at small, local places. We call ahead, the day or two before, and let them know what we need. They tell us if they can accommodate our needs and when they can meet our needs, we experience far fewer cases of cross contamination than at national chains.

Bread:

This is a tough one at first. We are so accustomed to store-bought bread, making it ourselves seems daunting. Now, if you can have eggs, you do have pre-made bread options at groceries (often in the frozen food aisle) and fresh-baked at natural foods stores. If you can’t have eggs, or don’t care for the taste and texture of pre-made GF bread, here are a couple of things that work for us:

  • Search for egg-free bread sites. I found this one, and have since modified the bread recipe, but it is by far the best I’ve found yet.
  • If you can have egg, this recipe is very good.
  • With slight modification, I have found this to be the best pizza dough recipe out there.
  • I’m working on a method of making bread in English muffin molds that make “sandwich-style” bread- watch for a post on that soon!
  • Remember, lettuce makes a great wrap for tuna salads, and even lunch meats.

Finally, the ultimate trick is to get into a rhythm of making the bread regularly once you find a recipe and method that works for you. We’re almost there, but not quite. Ideally, I’d like to make bread dough once a week and freeze it. Then thaw and bake when I need it.

What did I forget? Let me know if I left an element of gluten-free life off of the list, or, if you have your own experience or tip to add. After all, we’re all in this together!


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Gluten-Free and Dairy-Free, a cookie (and ice cream) for a friend

Clearly, when faced with a dietary restriction, I go straight for the sweet treat and figure out how to make it. This is probably not the healthiest approach, but it is what I do.

My friend, The Diva, is currently fighting breast cancer (and doing a great job I might add).  She’s on a Mediterranean diet, which is a low-fat diet focused on fresh foods.  She is also avoiding foods with estrogen links, like soy.  I got to see her last week, and wanted to make a treat.  The first thing I thought of was ice cream to help with the various sore throats she’s been experiencing.  I had been dairy-free for 18 months so I wanted to immediately direct her to my favorite dairy-free frozen treats, which include some great fruit sorbet recipes from How to Eat Supper, which are easy to make even without an ice cream maker.  Another easy to make sorbet come from Food Network and Giada At Home.  It is a Pomegranate and Mint Sorbet, and is so good- especially with the chocolate chips, and you can make the simple syrup with agave instead of sugar to lower the glycemic index.  Both those icy treats are great because they are low-fat, and you can control the sugar content, so it is easy to make a yummy treat with lower sugar.  Finally, in my dairy-free days I loved better balanced coconut based ice creams, that are both low in sugars because they use stevia as a sweetener.  Other than the fat from the coconut, these seemed like a great fit for my friend.  Check out The Ice Dream Cookbook and there is a Better Balance Ice Cream cookbook out there that I’m having trouble finding on-line.  When I find it I’ll update this post.  Finally, for those of you who can have soy, Tofu Cookery has a great selection of tofu-based ice creams.  When I was dairy-free, these were some of my favorites.

When I realized that the ice creams might be problematic from both the sugar or fat content, and honestly, it wouldn’t travel very well, I started thinking about cookies.  Which led me to Quinoa, Cherry, Applesauce Cookies. I took the oatmeal cookie recipes I have in various spots around my house and developed this.  It comes out a bit more like a scone than a cookie because of the lower sugar content, and I baked it at a lower temperature to make it chewy.  But, it fit the bill!

Quinoa, Cherry, Applesauce Cookies.

I beat together:

  • 3/4 cup applesauce
  • 1/4 cup combination of dairy-free palm shortening and coconut oil.  If you don’t need to be dairy free, I’d do butter here.  Let’s face it, gluten-free cooking needs at least a little fat.
  • 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons of honey.  Those 2 tablespoons could be molasses too.  I did not reduce the liquid in this recipe even though I substituted the honey for sugar.  The recipe came out too dry when I cut back on the liquids.  Also, in my first test batch I scaled back on the honey, and it just wasn’t enough sweet to overcome the bitter taste of quinoa.
  • 1 TBSP flax steeped in 3 TBSP water
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla

In a separate bowl, I mixed together:

  • 1/2 tsp of salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp of cinnamon
  • 1 tsp of xanthum gum
  • 1 1/2 cups quinoa flakes (If you find the bitterness of quinoa bothers you, cut this back to 1 cup and use 3 cups of bean flour blend)
  • 2 1/2 cups bean four flour blend
  • 1 cup dried cherries (any dried fruit would work here)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda

I mixed the two sets of ingredients together and then I let it sit and hydrate for at least a 1/2 hour.  I sometimes will let a cookie dough sit overnight even.

The dough comes together well and holds together really well before you bake it.

After spooning the dough out onto cookie sheets, I put the sheets in a 325 oven, and 20 minutes later I had nice, chewy cookies.  Perfect for little hands and good friends.

Quinoa Cherry Cookies (and milk, in a sippy cup)

What I like about this experiment is that it does reduce the fat.  The original recipes called for about 1 cup of fat; either butter, oil, or a combination of the two.  And as you learn when cooking gluten-free, to make up for the lack of gluten, most recipes have you use a ton of butter or eggs.  We found that the Geographer’s weight first declined a bit when we switched to gluten-free and then started going up as our foods suddenly contained a lot more fat.  Perhaps tricks like the applesauce will help in the future!

Finally, why did I make a gluten-free cookie for my friend who isn’t gluten-free?  First, I don’t keep wheat flour in the house anymore.  Second, according to Dr Peter Green in Celiac Disease:  A Hidden Epidemic, gluten-free diets might help cancer patients.  They certainly don’t hurt.

Speedy healing Diva!

1/26/12: Updated for a spelling fix!


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Where have you been hoisin?

Hiding right in the open.  That’s where.  As a good friend pointed out earlier this week, hoisin is essentially a sweetened, thickened soy sauce. Over the last few weeks we’ve tried two methods.

First, we tried making a quarter cup of “hoisin” that was mostly molasses, with a few red pepper flakes, with a little beef broth and a teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce.  (As an aside, Better than Bouillon makes a soy-free, gluten-free beef base.  Not all of their bases are soy-free, so you have to watch the labels, but their Organic base is- regular is not.)  Anyway, this worked fairly well.  I just mixed it in to the stir-fry I was making and it tasted great.

As in my earlier post about soy-sauce, if you need more than a 1/4 cup, I think cooking it and thickening it works better.

V&A Soy-free hoisin sauce: (~1 cup)

  • 3/4 cup beef broth
  • 2 Tbsp cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup molasses (more or less to taste)
  • 1 tsp grated ginger
  • 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes (more or less to taste)
  • 1 tsp each of Worcestershire sauce and fish sauce

Combine all of these ingredients and let them come to a boil and let it reduce about a 1/4.  Then add

  • 1 Tbsp of corn starch in about an 1/8th of a cup of water

Add the cornstarch slurry to the mix and heat and stir until it thickens.  Serve with your favorite stir fry!  Now I think we can eat all our favorite Asian dishes again.  Time to dust off those recipes.  This also means my weeknight standby of veggie stir-fry is back on the menu.  I love substitution!


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Soy-free Asian? It’s possible, and delicious

Not every post I make will be about baked goods.  Honest.  For example, this week it’s all about savory.  That key to Asian cooking, the savory and umame filled soy sauce.  How does one cook Asian food without soy?  Well, we’ve made a game of it, and no recipe enters this house and comes out the same in the end.  Anymore, recipes are really just guides and templates for whatever we’re making, which is a nice place to be.  We’ve finally learned to cook enough that we don’t need recipes.

If you search for soy-free soy sauce, you will find a host of ideas that play with the same ingredients; beef broth, cider vinegar, maybe some molasses, some recommend ginger.  We’ve found playing with all of those flavors, then reducing them makes for a great stir fry sauce, but what if you want a 1/4 cup of soy sauce for a recipe.  It’s a lot of work to reduce all those other things for one little 1/4 cup.

Our solution for small amounts of soy-sauce in recipes is to use Worcestershire sauce with several drops of fish sauce.  So far the only soy-free, gluten-free Worcestershire sauce I’ve found is Lea and Perrins brand, but only their reduced sodium, the rest have soy in them.  Our favorite kind of fish sauce is Three Crabs, and we usually have to go to an Asian market to get it.  If you’ve never used fish sauce before, don’t be alarmed when you smell it – it smells awful.  But, you don’t really taste it if you use is in small quantities.  It blends nicely with whatever you’re making and gives it that depth of flavor that umame-filled foods tend to have.

Next stop on our Asian food adventure creating a great hoisin sauce replacement.  Anyone have any suggestions?

Updated 4/4 to fix typos.


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Subtracting foods increases our options

Limitations breed creativity.  That’s my motto in the kitchen, which is good.  We have a long list of foods that my husband reacts to, most are allergies.  One such food is citrus.  Yep.  You would be amazed at how many foods you eat in a day have some citrus in them. But, like all food restrictions, when one pantry door closes, another opens up – with the added bonus that the food made through substitutions keeps everyone feeling healthy!   What are your options if you are citrus-free?  Our favorites include:

  • Sumac berries we mainly used dried ones, which are easy to find in Mediterranean markets.  It’s the red spice some people sprinkle over humus.  Others make a lemonade -like drink out of the fresh berries, watch for a post on that later this summer (I hope!).
  • Tamarind a dried fruit concentrate that you can easily find in Indian groceries.  I use this a lot in soups or stir-fries.  Just cut the amount in half.  If your recipe calls for 1 tablespoon lemon juice, use 1 to 1 1/2 tsp tamarind.  A little goes a long way!
  • Cider vinegar especially in soups or casseroles, in small quantities, can replace that sour taste without making your dish taste like vinegar.
  • We’ve also been better about using herbs like parsley and cilantro, which also provide a citrus-like taste to foods.
  • For large quantities of citrus replacement, I like to use pomegranate.  It is easy to find in grocery stores and has tartness to it.

Which brings me to a recent cake I wanted to make.  I subscribe to the Splendid Table’s Weeknight Kitchen, which is a mostly weekly email with very yummy and usually quick meals.  Sometimes they throw in dessert recipes, and the French Lemon Yogurt Cake they printed from A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table by Molly Wizenberg seemed too tempting.  Never mind that the main ingredients are lemon and wheat flour.  By the time I was done with it, it was a completely different cake, but very satisfying!

I created the Pomegranate Yogurt Cake for the same dinner with friends I described in my last post.  I started in on the cake about a week before our dinner, when I stared looking in earnest for ground pomegranate seeds.  I’d been looking for months for them, after I had heard somewhere about their use as a sour agent in some types of cooking.  I checked the Mediterranean market several times, the high-end spice store, the grocery store, and then I finally found it at the Indian Grocery.  They called them anardana powder.  I call them tart and slightly bitter, a nice replacement for citrus zest.

Pomegranate Yogurt Cake:
I followed the directions for the Lemon Cake, roughly well.  I substituted  1-1/2 cups 4 flour bean blend for the flour called for in the recipe.
I also added in 1 teaspoon xantham gum and substitued  2 teaspoons pomegranate seeds for the lemon zest.  In place of the eggs, we used 3 tablespoons ground flax-seed steeped in 9 tablespoons boiling water.  Let the flax steep about 15 minutes, or until the mix is the consistency of an egg.

The recipe also called for both a syrup and an icing for the cake.  When it called for lemon juice, I substituted pomegranate juice in the same amount.  It baked for about 40 minutes, and came out fairly well.  It was a little dense, but I have some ideas on how to deal with that.  More soon, but in the mean time….Eat and enjoy!

Updated on 4/3 to accommodate my evolving understanding of copyright rules 🙂  Oh, and to fix a few typos.  Cheers!