Violets and Amaranth

Eating weeds and gaining grains: an adventure in eating

Thoughts on the Allergy-Free Deserts Cookbook (and my all purpose flour blend recipe)

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Despite my lack of posts, I am in fact managing to make a recipe a week out of Elizabeth Gordon’s cookbook Allergy-Free Deserts.  And if you haven’t done so already, go check out her blog.  I have tried 10 of her recipes so far, and I’d rate 8 out of 10 as top-notch, and the two that weren’t absolutely amazing, were so much better than anything else I’ve tried, and honestly the lack of perfection was probably user error.  Here are my thoughts:

Three cakes (with frosting):

I have made the Coconut Cake, Chocolate Zucchini Cupcakes, and let’s throw the Berry Muffins in here too, even though they aren’t technically cake.  All three are 5 out of 5 stars.  Just perfect.  They all had great taste and felt like cake.  None of them lasted long in this house and I served both the cake and cupcakes to family and friends who also agreed they were great!  I did try a version of the Vegan Buttercream Frosting on the coconut cake, and that was a 4 out of 5 for me, but I am sure that was my fault.  I didn’t follow the recipe exactly, so I can’t be surprised it wasn’t the same level of perfection that the rest of the delights in this book seem to be.

A slice of coconut cake.

Chocolate Zucchini Cupcakes (and a rhododendron branch)

Five other great baked goods:

The very first recipe I tried were the Cherry Crumb Bars.  Mine didn’t work out quite right, this is another 4 out of 5, but it was good and the crumb toping tasted like crumb topping should.  I think the problems I had were again user error.  Why can’t I follow a recipe properly?  Oh, and if you make it- use two cans of pie filling- one just doesn’t seem to be enough 🙂 .

In the perfect category are the Cinnamon Swirl Rolls, the Pumpkin Bread (which we have also made and gifted to a friend already), Free-form Raspberry Scones, and the Pancakes.  Ah the Pancakes.  Seriously, I have never had such a great gluten-free pancake.  In fact, you won’t even notice they are gluten-free.  They are easy to make, and come out perfect every time.  We’ve tried for over a year to make such satisfying pancakes.  This recipe alone is worth the price of the book (with that coconut cake and the muffins also worth the price of admission).

Which brings me to pie:

I haven’t actually made any of the pies in the book yet, but I have made the pie crust for a beef pot pie and a fig pie.  It is good.  It’s the best gluten-free crust I’ve found yet.  It still isn’t as perfect as I want a pie crust to be, but honestly, if I never find anything better than this, I’ll be happy.

Why the lack of photos?  Most things we ate so fast, we didn’t even stop to get the camera.  She has great photos in the book though.

Final Thoughts:

In my mind, two reasons these recipes are so great are 1) she’s trained in baking, so she knows what she’s doing but more importantly 2) she found a great flour blend that actually works.  If you are like us, first you start with a commercial blend, but it tastes off.  Then you start trying to make a blend yourself, but things don’t rise, the item is only good 10 minutes after you bake it, or it still tastes off.  I always thought this had something to do with us not using eggs.  Now I know it gluten-free and egg-free can be very satisfying.

Her blend is a combo of garbanzo bean, tapioca and potato starch flours (and she sells it pre-made).  I was already experimenting with something similar, and actually haven’t used her exact blend in any of these recipes.  Instead I have riffed off her proportions to come up with a millet-based blend.  We have some family with issues with beans, so we try not to cook with bean flours, especially if we want to share!  I’m still tweaking the proportions, but basically this is the flour blend I have been using:

  • 1/4 Cup millet flour
  • 1/4 cup sorghum flour
  • 1/4 cup potato starch OR sweet rice flour
  • 1/4 cup tapioca flour

If I need more flour, I up the proportion of millet and sorghum first and then the potato and tapioca.  I’m finding that as long as I use some combination of these flours, most recipes are fairly forgiving if I deviate from the proportions.

A year and a half in, and maybe, just maybe, we’re starting to figure this out 🙂

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